Bullfighting: Fine art? Or barbaric entertainment?

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A matador makes moves with his cape to gruel a bull.

INTRODUCED as a spectator sport in 1726 in Spain, bullfighting went on to spread like a cancer into the south of France, Portugal, Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador and Peru.

It bears several names: Corrida de torros, La fiesta or Novilada, but the essence remains the same – a bull is tortured and killed in front of thousands of cheering spectators, who call this “a fine art”.

It taps into a primal human instinct – a blood lust- and is similar to the events in the gladiatorial arenas of ancient Rome. But in the modern world is there still a place for slaughter to be considered a fine art?

Dmitry Dmitriev of Booked.net poses some questions about this controversial sport.

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Myth and reality – lost cities and civilizations

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Eldorado

THE world is dotted with abandoned cities that fell victim to hostility, disease and natural disasters.

In life after people, towns, cities and entire civilizations are left to decay and fall into ruin, waiting to be rediscovered centuries after.

Many such places become time capsules of history that capture the imaginations and intrigue generations of modern people – while some remain the stuff of legend.

Booked.net investigates.

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